Un-Apple?

Who out there has broken up with Apple? (No, I don’t want to hear from the Android all along crowd, unless you have break-up information.) I’m not big on regrets, but right now, I’m really sorry I let my first smartphone, an Android, turn into an Apple. (It was a company phone, and…) I’ve been quite the i-Girl for a long while, but especially after FOUR calls to/from Apple to sort out something that was actually straightforward (and not resolved to my liking), I wish I could just trade in my phone, watch and tablet and make a clean break.

I don’t like proprietary bunk, and I especially don’t like being told I can’t wholly edit my account. Sadly, all of my i-devices are alive and quite well, so I can’t really switch them all out in the foreseeable future.

I am Google and Chrome all the way, and may have sincerely been one of the first people with a Gmail account, so it makes sense to go Android when I can, but if Apple won’t allow me to change my “alias” email (I can add, but can’t delete the one I want to see go away), it makes me want to plan my break-up NOW, ages before it will happen.

So if you’ve made the switch, what do I need to know? What do I need to do? I know apps will change, and that’s not the worst thing. I can certainly download all of the photos and save the important (read: dog!) ones, and I presume the phone company will have some way to export/import contacts – or not?! (I am suddenly reminded of all of the friends who post on Facebook “New phone; lost all contacts… message me with your number please!”)

I’m going to go do some yoga. I actually told one of the Apple reps he made me want to throw my phone – and I meant it.

Little Helpers

There’s so much I want to say and share, but digging deep and baring the soul is hard work. In the meantime, let’s get to know each other (again, better, etc.).

Today, it’s all about the little things I’ve discovered that make life easier, better. We are all about finding joy and laughter, crafting peace and living with grace.

Old friends know Gretchen is high maintenance. (Read: the dog is highly intelligent and overthinks everything, creating much anxiety in her little head.) I have mixed feelings about “home hubs” and too much automation, but the “puppy plug” changed our lives instantly.

Amazon calls it their own smart plug. We used it to replace the (broken) old school timer we were using to light the living room in the evenings, whether I was home or not. Here’s the best part: you don’t have to buy a hub! I downloaded the Alexa app, created an account linked to my Amazon account, and selected a pre-sunset turn on time.

Best of all, as long as the house and I both are connected to WiFi, I can do what I please with the plug. The pampered princess won’t have to be in the dark if I forget to bump the timer up or back as the nightfall moment changes. The pet sitter doesn’t have to remember to leave a light on for the girl. I don’t even have to remember to turn the light off.

Our perfect, precious sitter is much more than a little helper, and if you don’t know the story, Gretchen found her on her own. We are so, so grateful for our amazing neighbors, but especially so for that one young woman who loves Gg and tends to her happiness.

Chike is my morning everything. Thanks to the magic of manufactured nutrition, I get my coffee and the high protein breakfast I need in one large cup. I just can’t do FOOD in the morning, but I am not fit to be around without coffee and sustenance. I’ve used a lot of protein powders and Chike peanut butter flavor is the one constant on the smoothie shelf in the pantry.

I sure hope the summer heat is on its way out, but I need help staying hydrated year-round. I drink at least 100 ounces of water daily, but like a lot of people, I need electrolyte support sometimes. I keep a tube of Nunn tablets in my purse, at my desk at work and in the drawer at home. My favorite flavor is the watermelon, but I also like lemon lime, tropical and … all the flavors. I use the sport formula, but again, all of them taste great and work as advertised.

There are plenty of other goodies I use daily and loyally, but that’s the list for today. What makes your life easier?

Drawing lines

There’s a pleasant little challenge on my Facebook page now that spilled over onto my Instagram account and now… here we are. Not all of my pals are on all of the same social media feeds I am, and I want all of the feedback, all of the thoughts on this one.

I started this book about a year ago. I can’t remember who recommended it; ironically, I think I saw it on a social media feed. I follow an assorted mix of folks on Facebook, Instagram and once in a while, even Twitter, so many thank to whomever planted this seed.

And here’s the discussion, in typical Chan, stream of consciousness and almost run-on sentences…

I perceive myself as confident, capable and sometimes, yes… a badass. I am not senile or ignorant; I know I was a pioneer as a female firefighter in the 20th century. I realize that not many 50 year old women can squat, bench and/or dealift more than their bodyweight. While I work for and with some phenomenal, smart, talented women, I do still work in a male-dominated industry, and I hold my own. So imagine my surprise when one of those female powerhouses cut me off yesterday and scolded me, “Don’t sell yourself short.”

So I ask you friends, where is the line between being candid, self-aware, etc. and selling one’s self short?

Or as I asked on Instagram, where is the line between humble and selling yourself short? Heck, I don’t even claim to be humble. I play to my strengths and will go so far as to give myself credit for surrounding myself with people – especially in my girl tribe – who compliment and/or challenge my weaknesses and “areas with room for growth and development.” Being humble is a virtue I can only work at growing into, but now I’m curious… do I sell myself short?

The unvarnished truth is … I know I do. I want to pull (deadlift, if you prefer) 300 pounds. It isn’t unreasonable, given my build, my knack for picking up heavy things, or even when compared to my PRs (personal records) in other lifts, but for reasons I won’t even try to explain, the deadlift is my humbling lift. It’s THE ONE where my head gets in the way and I can’t find my way around it. Yeah, those of you who know about my back are making the same, safe, fair enough excuses I make, but the truth is, I am strong enough, fit enough, to move 300 pounds the roughly 30″ it takes to pull the bar off the floor and lock out with my short arms and legs straight, from the sumo stance.

But we aren’t here to debate whether I should or could deadlift 300 pounds. (I WILL, and you’ll all hear all about it when I do!) The point is, if I dismiss my potential there, I am selling myself short. And like any good fan of true-false tests, if it’s not 100% true, it’s false. So therefore, I do sell myself short and I need to stop!

So talk to me about selling ourselves short. Where are the lines and what do we do about them?